5 Famous hidden song meanings (that are total b.s.) trading places stock market scene video

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Because songwriters worry more about catchy rhymes than deep meaning, song lyrics can be more abstract and esoteric than Jackson Pollock farting chalk dust into a napkin. The problem is that some fans swear that every nonsensical song has some deeper interpretation just waiting to be decoded. That’s why so many classic songs have mythical (and often dark and disturbing) alternate meanings that fans insist are true.

Whether you know "Hotel California" as "that weird Eagles song" or "that weird devil-worshiping song" probably depends on how religious your parents were.

When " Hotel California" was released in 1976, everyone heard it but no one really knew what it meant futures markets cnn. The lyrics talked about trying to "Kill the beast" and "Stab it with their steely knives," and included the ominous line, "You can check out anytime you like but you can never leave." Honestly, it kind of sounds like they’re singing about using the reference section in a library full of giant monsters, since those are the books you can technically check out but aren’t permitted to remove from the building.


That was when someone noticed something odd about the album cover, which features a picture of the band in some luxury hotel courtyard with crowds of people in the background. Above the crowd, looking out from a balcony on the upper left, is a shape whose face you can’t fully see, but vaguely looks bald, goateed and threatening.

Naturally, people came to the conclusion that the figure on the balcony was none other than Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan, author of The Satanic Bible and proud parent of a son that he freaking named Satan.

Now that Anton LaVey was found, the lyrics seemed to make sense: "The Beast," "You can never leave" "This could be heaven or this could be hell." "Hotel California" is a song about Anton LaVey converting people to his church of Satanism, from which they could "never leave." The "truth" about the song persists to this day, found in Internet forums, an old issue of The Milwaukee Sentinel and the nothing-if-not-reputable website Jesus Is Savior.

"Hotel California" has pretty much nothing to do with Satanism euro to pound sterling exchange rate. The Eagles have admitted it was a way of speaking out against the greed and hedonism of the music industry in the 1970s (i.e., the drugs, money and women they themselves were drowning in). The photographer responsible for the album cover said the picture expressed "faded loss of innocence and decadence," which is pretentious-speak for "a bunch of assholes standing in a lobby."

"What about the face in the window?" you say. "I heard somewhere they didn’t even know it was there binary to text converter. Maybe it wasn’t Anton LaVey, but really … a ghost." Unfortunately not. As Snopes points out:

Clearly it’s alluding to an acid trip. And this isn’t exactly a stretch: The Beatles, remember, were a band that wrote songs about an octopus inviting people to the seabed to visit his garden, people who believe they are Arctic blueberry animals and general dick-twisting insanity.

Shockingly, "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" is about a girl called Lucy, in the sky, with some diamonds. See, John Lennon’s son Julian drew a picture of his best friend Lucy surrounded by diamonds in the sky, and John liked it enough to name the song after it.

The Beatles freely admit to using drugs as inspiration for songs, and odds are LSD was one of them. But as for this particular song being a metaphor for the drug itself? Sorry, but no usd rupee exchange rate. John Lennon said, "It was purely unconscious that it came out to be LSD. Until someone pointed it out, I never even thought of it. I mean, who would ever bother to look at initials of a title? It’s not an acid song."

This didn’t stop the BBC from banning the song, which, considering they were OK with a song about a child who murdered the fuck out of everyone around him with a goddamn hammer, seems a little hypocritical.

"I had spent a good deal of time poking around in the high desert with my brother when we lived [in California] binary file viewer. And we’d drive through Arizona and New Mexico current exchange rate usd to aud. I loved the cactus and the heat. I was trying to capture the sights and sounds of the desert, and there was an environmental message at the end. But … I see now that this anonymous horse was a vehicle to get me away from all the confusion and chaos of life to a peaceful, quiet place."

So, back when he was a kid, Dewey was playing around in the desert, found it interesting and years later wrote a song about it with a message about the environment. No heroin-induced hallucinations or allegorical desert, but real, actual desert.

"I’ve got your picture, I’ve got your picture/ I’d like a million of you all round my cell/ I want a doctor to take your picture/ So I can look at you from inside as well."

He mentions a cell, so this must mean he’s in prison cad usd graph. Also, he seems to want an X-ray of her, for some reason. Or photos from her colonoscopy.

"No sex, no drugs, no wine, no women/ No fun, no sin, no you, no wonder it’s dark/ Everyone around me is a total stranger/ Everyone avoids me like a cyclone ranger/ That’s why I’m turning Japanese/ I think I’m turning Japanese/ I really think so."

It would seem that this trail of lyrical bread crumbs leads to but one place: Fistopolis. Population: This guy’s wiener gsm sms. Just take a look at the people interviewed in this video, at about 2 minutes 20 seconds. It’s a pretty popular interpretation, and any sites mentioning the song on the Internet eventually come to the same conclusion.

We really wanted this one to be true, but the only thing this song has in common with spanking it in a darkened room is that it’s about feelings of shame and loneliness. If you watch the end of that video linked above, the band finally tells us what it’s really about:

"The Americans seemed to think it was written about that dollar exchange rate calculator. That it was an English phrase about masturbation. It wasn’t stock market futures prices. The song was a love song about someone who had lost their girlfriend and was going slowly crazy — turning Japanese is just all the cliches of our angst… turning into something you never expected to."

So no, the Vapors’ song isn’t about dick-whittling (masturbation/penis joke quota met). It’s simply about a man who has taped hundreds of pictures of a woman he’s obsessed with around his tiny room as he plots to see her insides, and whose emotions can apparently transform him into a Japanese man like the Incredible Hulk.

For more misconstrued meanings, check out 6 Pieces of Music That Mean The Opposite of What You Think and 8 Romantic Songs You Didn’t Know Were About Rape.

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