Best way to exchange aud to usd when aud is dropping – australia forum – tripadvisor aud usd yahoo

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Able, the problem with the Westpac card amongst others is the hidden margin on exchange rates. This is what inas alluded to with "Preloaded cards you pay around 6%+"

Westpac, like most vendors of these preloaded cards, tries to hide this, and manages quite well in doing so aus to us exchange rate. On the travel card part of the web site, they say the exchange rate is simply, "The Westpac foreign exchange rates current at the time you transfer funds." But that obfuscates the matter, because they have worse exchange rates for their travel cards compared to other methods of exchanging money!

You can only see the real exchange rate margin by going to the currency converter, where at this moment the rate is 0.9022 to buy USD on the Global Currency Card binary to decimal conversion method. This compares to 0.9392 on another site for the mid-rate – or about 4% of extra exchange margin!


When you also include the loading fee of 1% you’re up to 5% – not as bad as some other cards, but not exactly a super deal unless you are very lucky with a big drop in the exchange rates between now and then.

Compare this to using a normal Westpac debit card, with exchange processed by the Visa network at about the midrate. You will also pay a Westpac foreign exchange fee of 3% in that case, which makes it somewhat better than the 5% with their travel money card exchange rate uk to us. Next, consider that you can avoid this 3% extra fee by going with the Citibank card instead.

Who forecast that? How do they know? If those who write for the papers and make these predictions actually *knew* what they were talking about they would be at their computers making megabucks on the currency markets, not writing predictions and drawing graphs for newspapers.

I looked into the Westpac card quite carefully when it came out for the same reason, but decided against it for all the reasons mentioned by Jeremy and able suggested.

If you really think the AUD will go down, withdraw a bunch of cash, drop into your nearest exchange booth, change it into USD and stick the notes under your mattress till you leave.

Able, the problem with the Westpac card amongst others is the hidden margin on exchange rates. This is what inas alluded to with "Preloaded cards you pay around 6%+"

Westpac, like most vendors of these preloaded cards, tries to hide this, and manages quite well in doing so. On the travel card part of the web site, they say the exchange rate is simply, "The Westpac foreign exchange rates current at the time you transfer funds." But that obfuscates the matter, because they have worse exchange rates for their travel cards compared to other methods of exchanging money!

You can only see the real exchange rate margin by going to the currency converter, where at this moment the rate is 0.9022 to buy USD on the Global Currency Card canadian dollar to us exchange rate. This compares to 0.9392 on another site for the mid-rate – or about 4% of extra exchange margin! When you also include the loading fee of 1% you’re up to 5% – not as bad as some other cards, but not exactly a super deal unless you are very lucky with a big drop in the exchange rates between now and then.

Compare this to using a normal Westpac debit card, with exchange processed by the Visa network at about the midrate. You will also pay a Westpac foreign exchange fee of 3% in that case, which makes it somewhat better than the 5% with their travel money card binary search in c. Next, consider that you can avoid this 3% extra fee by going with the Citibank card instead.

Who forecast that? How do they know? If those who write for the papers and make these predictions actually *knew* what they were talking about they would be at their computers making megabucks on the currency markets, not writing predictions and drawing graphs for newspapers.

I looked into the Westpac card quite carefully when it came out for the same reason, but decided against it for all the reasons mentioned by Jeremy and able suggested.

If you really think the AUD will go down, withdraw a bunch of cash, drop into your nearest exchange booth, change it into USD and stick the notes under your mattress till you leave.

Able, the problem with the Westpac card amongst others is the hidden margin on exchange rates exchange rate euro to dollar forecast. This is what inas alluded to with "Preloaded cards you pay around 6%+"

Westpac, like most vendors of these preloaded cards, tries to hide this, and manages quite well in doing so. On the travel card part of the web site, they say the exchange rate is simply, "The Westpac foreign exchange rates current at the time you transfer funds." But that obfuscates the matter, because they have worse exchange rates for their travel cards compared to other methods of exchanging money!

You can only see the real exchange rate margin by going to the currency converter, where at this moment the rate is 0.9022 to buy USD on the Global Currency Card cool pictures to draw easy. This compares to 0.9392 on another site for the mid-rate – or about 4% of extra exchange margin! When you also include the loading fee of 1% you’re up to 5% – not as bad as some other cards, but not exactly a super deal unless you are very lucky with a big drop in the exchange rates between now and then.

Compare this to using a normal Westpac debit card, with exchange processed by the Visa network at about the midrate. You will also pay a Westpac foreign exchange fee of 3% in that case, which makes it somewhat better than the 5% with their travel money card gender theories pdf. Next, consider that you can avoid this 3% extra fee by going with the Citibank card instead.

Who forecast that? How do they know? If those who write for the papers and make these predictions actually *knew* what they were talking about they would be at their computers making megabucks on the currency markets, not writing predictions and drawing graphs for newspapers.

I looked into the Westpac card quite carefully when it came out for the same reason, but decided against it for all the reasons mentioned by Jeremy and able suggested.

If you really think the AUD will go down, withdraw a bunch of cash, drop into your nearest exchange booth, change it into USD and stick the notes under your mattress till you leave.

DON’T use the NAB card; I just checked their interest rates and it’s nearly 10% less than the interbank rate (the official exchange rate). Get a 28Degrees MasterCard or a Citibank Plus Visa Debit Card (both available online). The 28Degrees card is, as you would guess, a credit card, which has a 25 days interest free period so you pay no interest if you pay it off within 25 days of the statement date usd to ntd. The Citibank card is a debit account that deducts your own money immediately. Both have the best exchange rate you will get and it’s close to the interbank rate, closer to 1% less. So you would save nearly 9% (which on 1,000s of dollars is worth doing) by using either card.

Able, I’m assuming Susan is planning to use her NAB card and I’m going by the exchange rates (for IDR) they publish on their website. Their rate for USD is a bit better but doesn’t take into account their added on foreign exchange fees which effectively make the rate lower, though apparently it is a flat $10 for any amount. Obviously the trick if you decided to deal with them would be to exchange a huge amount in one hit pre market oil futures. BTW, Citibank is selling USD today at .8027 according to their website.

I’m not convinced the AUD will drop sufficiently against the USD to justify hedging at this point, especially if you’re buying through a bank with their poorer exchange rates and foreign exchange fees eating into the amount you will get. And if Susan buys USD and loses real value in fees on the transaction, then takes the USD to Bali and exchanges it again for IDR, she will lose value in fees a second time.

OMG This is why I am soooo confused! Just reading your comments makes my hands sweat 🙂 I can travel with IDR cash so what I can gather from the above comments I will contact the hotel and ask them to quote me in IDR and just take the cash over with me.

The place where I am staying I have stayed before and am confident with their honesty regarding transfers etc. Last time I went I took some IDR cash and so AUD cash and just changed it at the hotel counter but this time I will be taking so much more as I have a wedding to pay for and I am really concerned about taking that amount of cash on me and there are limits on the amount of cash you can carry.


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